Risk vs. Reward

DSC_6081Relationship between stepping out and taking a risk to the potential for success, growth and achievement for taking that risk

Only those who do nothing make no mistakes. Author Unknown

The greatest risk is the risk of riskless living. Stephen Covey

The reward of a thing well done is to have done it. Emerson

  Those who have mastered a good understanding of the concept of risk versus reward have something to teach us. These individuals typically get more out of life, are more successful and wiser, and likely have achieved their share of joy and happiness.

This is a bold concept. If we dissect and understand the implications, we have a concept that is a powerful tool we can use to enrich our lives. It can be a springboard or as a new compass gets us going in new directions. It can add new zest and vitality to our life. This is the reward side of the risk versus reward equation. On the risk side, anything that takes us out of our comfort zone, away from complacency, status quo and going through the motions; puts us at risk of tasting disappointment, falling down, having setbacks, scraping our knees, damaging our egos and having to potentially deal with unwanted adversities.

A common adage is “no pain no gain. There is correlation between risk versus reward and no pain no gain. If we never putting anything at risk; if we are never willing to risk pain; then we are not likely to get much done. Einstein defined insanity as continuing to do the same thing and expecting different results. This correlates with “there is no such thing as a free lunch, no such thing as something for nothing, and “you get what you pay for.”

Adages such as “Where there is a will, there is a way”, we get out of life in proportion to what we put into it, “Nothing ventured, nothing gained” apply as well. The concepts of persistence and perseverance bring to mind such sayings as “By the inch it is a cinch, the journey of a thousand miles begins with the first step and if at first you do not succeed, then try and try again”. Each of these adages provide profound truths.

If we want more out of life, we must be willing to get our feet wet. If we feel the frustration of not living up to our potential or being stuck in a rut, we must overcome inertia and our stagnancy and then go into action. We must be willing to risk. Are the risks taken worth the potential rewards? Chances are that the answer is “Yes!” “If it is to be then it is up to me.”

Challenge: Words are cheap. Actions speak louder than words. Your life and future are in your hands. Make out of them as you will. It is easy to sit back and think of all the reasons not to change anything. It is easy to come up with a long list of excuses why leaving well enough is the thing to do. As long as you think and act this way then you should expect things to stay the same. Einstein reminds you that it is insanity to think any differently.

Wisdom:  The man who does things makes many mistakes, but he never makes the biggest mistake of all – doing nothing. Benjamin Franklin

Spiritual: (NIV)

Tell the righteous it will be well with them, for they will enjoy the fruit of their deeds. Isaiah 3:10

Trust in the Lord with all your heart and lean not on your own understanding; in all your ways acknowledge him, and he will make your paths straight. Proverbs 3: 5, 6

For God did not give us a spirit of timidity, but a spirit of power, of love and of self-discipline. 2 Timothy 1:7

Many of us have spent too much of our lives in fear, apathy, complacency, vegetating, chilling or just existing. We are in a rut, accepting where we are and what we have, and thinking that there is nothing we can do to make things better or more rewarding. The Bible teaches us that not only does it not have to be that way, but that is should not be that way. We have not because we do not believe or take action. We tend to get what we ask for.

Prayer: Help me to become the agent of change I should be. Help me not to accept less than the best in my life.

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